Londone Myers walked in the Louis Vuitton runway show on Tuesday.

Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

The INSIDER Summary:

  • On September 30, model Londone Myers posted a time-lapse video that showed stylists refusing to help her backstage.
  • The model claims that stylists avoid her because they don’t know how to work with her hair.
  • “I don’t need special treatment from anyone. What I need is for hairstylists to learn how to do black hair,” she wrote in the video’s caption.
  • Other models of color like
    Jourdana Phillips and

    Nejilka Arias commented on Myers’ post and said that this is a common issue.
  • The response to Myers’ post has been mostly positive.

When it comes to diversity and inclusion, the fashion industry has come a long way — but it has a lot further to go.

Model Londone Myers recently posted a video to Instagram that showed how stylists avoided her backstage at an undisclosed Paris Fashion Week show. The model claims stylists ignored her because they don’t know how to work with her textured hair, which we first read about on People.

“I don’t need special treatment from anyone. What I need is for hairstylists to learn how to do black hair,” the caption of her video, which she posted on September 30, began.

During the video, you can see Myers sitting alone backstage while stylists mill around in the background, tending to the other models.

“I’m so tired of people avoiding doing my hair at shows. How dare you try to send me down the runway with a linty busted afro,” Myers wrote in the caption of her post. “We all know if you tried that on a white model you’d be #canceled.”


Myers during the Louis Vuitton show on Tuesday.

Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Myers’ post seems to have resonated with other models.

“Now that we have more models of color we need hairstylists, makeup artists, photographers etc that know how to support black beauty,” Victoria’s Secret model Jourdana Phillips commented on the post.

“Fashion wanted diversity right! Get some diverse HAIRSTYLISTS too!!” model Nejilka Arias wrote.

Her followers also agree that this is a problem.

“This just breaks my heart. The industry needs to do better. There are absolutely no excuses now,” one person commented. “Honestly, thank you so much for raising awareness about this,” another user wrote. “This is their job and they’re PAYED [sic] for it. There is no reason to not know how to do your hair,” a third person agreed.

At the time this story was published, Myers’ post had over 3,600 views and 164 comments — only one of which was negative.

“Sorry, but if you look at the people in your video, they have some difference to you. And thats [sic] not the color. They are comunicating [sic] with the others. If you sit there, dont [sic] talking a word and dont [sic] put your headphones off, I not[sic] wondering[sic] that no one comes to you,” they wrote.

Regardless, Myers is proud that she took a stand against something that has bothered her for some time.

“I was just so frustrated with how people would avoid even looking at me,” she told Teen Vogue. “I usually do my hair before every show, but this time I just showed up without anything on hand like everyone else.”

Myers claimed that she and “three or four” other black models at this particular show were sent down the runway looking “unpolished,” Teen Vogue reported.

“I simply asked around the room for who did black hair multiple times and was cast aside, until they sat me in this guy’s chair who tried to send me off looking unpolished, like the other [black] girls. One of the other black models saw all of the lint in my hair and was surprised,” she said.

Myers said finding solidarity with other models of color helped her during this situation. “I think at moments like these we need each other as POC [in fashion]. We need a good support system within our small group — and to give a helping hand when we can,” she told Teen Vogue.

The model elaborated on this in a follow-up Instagram post.

“I encourage my powerful working women not only be brave and speak out against the mistreatment they face within the industry – but to also help out and support the newer generation. There is more than enough room for more than one poc supermodel/ it girl at a time,” she wrote.

INSIDER has reached out to Myers for comment.

You can read Myers’ full follow-up post here:

“Thank you so much for all the love, passion, and, support from my community. I encourage my powerful working women not only be brave and speak out against the mistreatment they face within the industry – but to also help out and support the newer generation. There is more than enough room for more than one poc supermodel/ it girl at a time. We really need to take notes from the other poc who paved the way for us. I can’t imagine what working would be like for us if Naomi, Tyra, Bethann, or even Iman were too scared about not getting shows to speak up. You were born without these shows and you will die without them. Do it for the girls after us and the ones looking up to us. We as women of color need each other more than we need fashion.”